The Maori Voice, Parts 1 & 2 • Storytellers in motion (Series 1)

The Maori Voice, Parts 1 & 2 • Storytellers in motion (Series 1)

Available on DVDAvailable on VHSContains Closed Captioning

This two-part episode from the Storytellers in motion series features the Maori storytellers of New Zealand: Barry Barclay, Merata Mita, Tainui Stephens, Don Selwyn, Carey Carter and Vanessa Rare.

SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 4--13 parts)

SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 4--13 parts)

Available on DVDContains Closed Captioning

The fourth and final series examining the role of water in culture and spirituality of Indigenous people has a focus on stewardship and the efforts mounted to balance respect for environment with development. Four films visit New Zealand where the Maori have worked hard in the courts to ensure the rights of water in the face of industrial pressures. In Canada and Washington state, the role of First Nations in ensuring sustainability in their use of what water can offer is inspirational and a contrast with what happened with government and industry when millions of gallons of toxic chemicals were discharged into pristine wilderness from a breach of the dam at British Columbia's Mount Polley mine.

Tribal Journey, Part 4: Maoria Waka, Dugout Canoe and Birch Bark • SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 3)

Tribal Journey, Part 4: Maoria Waka, Dugout Canoe and Birch Bark • SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 3)

Available on DVDContains Closed Captioning

Anishinaabe canoe builder Wayne Vallier builds the birch bark canoe, explaining the one-year process of harvesting the materials. Birch bark was harvested in the east and shipped; spruce roots to lash the materials together were gathered on the west coast. Master Maori carver Dr. Takirirangi Smith, who had worked with Skokomish artist and carver John Smith in 2007 to build a Maori Waka, returned to paddle it. 

Tribal Journey, Part 5: The Village Welcome • SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 3)

Tribal Journey, Part 5: The Village Welcome • SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 3)

Available on DVDContains Closed Captioning

After a day's paddling, canoe families need to come ashore to rest and rejuvenate. The Village Welcome shows welcoming ceremonies at several landings. For the 14 canoes that left Beecher Bay on southern Vancouver Island July 17, 2012 and landed at Port Angeles, Washington, this was part of their tribal journey to Squaxin. 

Water As Taonga: Aotearoa • SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 4)

Water As Taonga: Aotearoa • SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 4)

Available on DVDContains Closed Captioning

A visit to the University of Waikato reveals more information about the terms of the 1840 Treaty of Waitangi in relation to Maori Water Rights in New Zealand.

Water As Taonga: Kaitiaki, Part 1 •  SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 4)

Water As Taonga: Kaitiaki, Part 1 • SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 4)

Available on DVDContains Closed Captioning

In keeping with the cultural belief that water is "taonga"--a precious cultural treasure--the Maori believe they are guardians, or "kaitiaki" of the environment.  The McGuire family, members of the Pahutiki Marae in Hawks Bay, New Zealand are struggling to restore a river system for a formerly abundant species of flounder and "tuna", or eel.

Water As Taonga: Kaitiaki, Part 2 •  SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 4)

Water As Taonga: Kaitiaki, Part 2 • SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 4)

Available on DVDContains Closed Captioning

Other explorations at restoring river systems can be found in the question: how do people mitigate the damage caused by dams and de-forestation? 

Water As Taonga: Water Is Taonga? • SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 4)

Water As Taonga: Water Is Taonga? • SAMAQAN: Water Stories (Series 4)

Available on DVDContains Closed Captioning

Marianne Jones and Jeff Bear travel from Canada's west coast to New Zealand where they meet with Maori leaders. The Maori explain the sacred relationship they have with water. Their migration to New Zealand in the 13th century predated that of settlers, or "infinite others" as the Maori call them, by 500 years; and in the 1840 Treaty of Waitangi, the Maori were granted rights for control of land, water and self-determination.