All ah We

All ah We

Available on DVD

Second-generation Caribbean Canadian Karen Chapman undergoes a cultural transformation into a carnival masquerader at Toronto’s Caribana Parade. On this colourful journey, she discovers her Afro and Indo-Caribbean heritage while asking, “Can you call a place home if you have never been there?”

Beauty Lies

Beauty Lies

Available on DVD

Karen Chapman examines media representation of beauty and hair, in particular. She interviews a number of women from the African and Caribbean Canadian community and in her journey to explore the relationship of hair to beauty shaves her head, only to experience a new sense of freedom.

The Boys Who Came to Play

The Boys Who Came to Play

Available on DVDContains Closed Captioning

Lois Bentley recalls the Golden Era of Prairie Baseball from 1948 to 1954, as she works to have African-American players Dirk Gibbons and Armando Vazquez, who came north to play for the Brandon Greys, inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Cest Moi

Cest Moi

Available on DVD

Set in modern-day Montréal, C'est Moi explores the collision of the past as it meets the present. Performance by Montréal native Jenny Brizard evokes the return of a ghostly figure, Marie-Josèph Angélique, a runaway slave in 18th century New France (Québec). She was accused of setting a fire in Vieux Montréal and subsequently tortured and hanged. As it prepared to celebrate its 375th anniversary, the City of Montréal removed a plaque that stated a declaration against racial discrimination, thus posing the question, "How much of our past is erased in the restoration of history?"

Echoes in the Rink: The Willie ORee Story

Echoes in the Rink: The Willie O'Ree Story

This documentary portrays Willi O'Ree, the first person to break the colour barrier in hockey. He made sports history when he joined the Bosten Bruins on January 18, 1958 and is known today as the "The Jackie Robinson of Hockey".

OWNING the SLAVE

OWNING the SLAVE

Available on DVD

This documentary follows ex-pat American Andy Stringfellow, who left behind the rich African-American culture of the rural south where he was raised, to move to Canada. Thirty years later, the only black man in a white town, he offers a frank, complex view into the experience of being an outsider.